The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) revealed on Monday that it has recovered sums totaling N152.1 billion, $386.2 million, £1.2 million, €156,246, €1.7 million. Saudi Riyals, 1,900 South African Rands and 1,400 Canadian Dollars between January and December 2021.

Reviewing its operational activities for the past year, the EFCC gave in a statement the total figures recovered from various people, in the coming year:

N152, 088 698 751.64,
$386,220,202.84,
£1,182,519.75,
€156,246.76,
1,723,310.00 Saudi Riyal,
1,900.00 South African Rand,
and 1,400.00 Canadian dollars.

The recovery basket, according to the anti-corruption agency, also included a digital currency component with 5.36957319 Bitcoin and 0.09012 Ethereum.

Leading the recoveries was EFCC Headquarters in Abuja with a total of N67,249,744,994.89, $375,662,223.59 and £1,151,539.75.

After HQ, Lagos Command led Naira recoveries with N70, 315,611,260.52, $9,286,497.83 and £21,500.00.

The EFCC said its Kaduna Area Command came third in Naira recoveries with a total of 3,339,405,723.93 Naira.

Ibadan Zonal Command however took the same third position in terms of dollar recoveries at $387,385.00.

The Executive Chairman of the Commission, Abdulrasheed Bawa, explained in his statement that the monies recovered include direct and indirect recoveries for the different levels of government (federal, state and local governments), businesses and individuals (victims of acts criminals) during the year. (2021) under review.

The commission in 2021 secured its highest number of convictions since its inception.

Prior to last year, the highest record for convictions by the EFCC was in 2019 with 1,280 convictions. However, the 2021 figures were 127.5% higher than the 2019 record.

The 2021 record represented a 98.49% success rate in prosecutions, with the anti-transplant agency losing just 34 cases in the year under review.

In his remarks, Bawa commended the staff of the commission for this performance, urging them to redouble their efforts to ensure that perpetrators of economic and financial crimes are denied the benefit of the proceeds of their crimes.